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CCS (Conduct) Rules - The Central Civil Services (Conduct) Rules, 1964 impose various restrictions on the Government servan...







CCS (Conduct) Rules - The Central Civil Services (Conduct) Rules, 1964 impose various restrictions on the Government servants. Important provisions of the Central Civil Services (Conduct) Rules, 1964 which impose such restrictions and as made applicable to employees of the Secretariat are as given below:



3-B Observance of Government’s policies

Every Employee of the Secretariat shall, at all times- 

(i) act in accordance with the Government’s policies regarding age of marriage, preservation of the environment, protection of wildlife, and cultural heritage. 


(ii) Observe the Government’s policies regarding prevention of crime against women.


3-C. Prohibition of Sexual harassment of working women
(1) No Employee of the Secretariat shall indulge in any act of sexual harassment of any woman at her workplace. 

(2) Every Employee of the Secretariat who is in charge of a workplace shall take appropriate steps to prevent sexual harassment to any woman at such workplace. Explanation- For the purpose of this rule, “sexual harassment” includes such unwelcome sexually determined behaviour, whether directly or otherwise, as- 

(a) physical contact and advances;

(b) demand or request for sexual favours;
(c) sexually coloured remarks;
(d) showing any pornography; or
(e) any other unwelcome physical, verbal or non-verbal conduct of a sexual nature.



(11) Rule 13. Receiving Gifts
(1) Save as otherwise provided in these rules, no Employee of the Secretariat shall accept, or permit any member of his/her family or any other person acting on his/her behalf to accept any gift. 


EXPLANATION:- The expression "gift" shall include free transport, boarding, lodging or other service or any other pecuniary advantage provided by any person other than a near relative or personal friend having no official dealings with the Employee of the Secretariat. 


NOTE 1. A casual meal, lift or other social hospitality shall not be deemed to be a gift. 

NOTE 2. An Employee of the Secretariat shall avoid accepting lavish hospitality or frequent hospitality from any individual, industrial or commercial firm, organization, etc., having official dealings with him/her. 

(2) On occasions such as weddings, anniversaries, funerals or religious functions, when the making of gift is in conformity with the prevailing religious and social practice, an Employee of the Secretariat may accept gifts from his/her near relatives or from his/her personal friends having no official dealing with him/her, but shall make a report to the Secretariat, if the value of such gift exceeds- 

(i) rupees seven thousand in case of an Employee of the Secretariat holding any Group 'A' post; 
(ii) rupees four thousand in the case of an Employee of the Secretariat holding any Group 'B' post; and 
(iii) rupees two thousand in the case of an Employee of the Secretariat holding any Group 'C' post. 


 (3) In any other case, an Employee of the Secretariat shall not accept any gift without the sanction of the Secretariat, if the value exceeds - 

(i) rupees one thousand five hundred in the case of Employee of the Secretariat holding any Group 'A' or Group 'B' post; and 
(ii) rupees five hundred in the case of Employee of the Secretariat holding any Group 'C' post. 

(4) Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-rules (2) and (3), an Employee of the Secretariat, being a member of the Indian delegation or otherwise, may receive and retain gifts from foreign dignitaries, if the market value of gifts received on one occasion does not exceed rupees one thousand. In all other cases, the acceptance and retention of such gifts shall be regulated by the instructions issued by the Government in this regard from time to time. 

(5) An Employee of the Secretariat shall not accept any gifts from any foreign firm which is either contracting with the Secretariat or is one with which the Employee of the Secretariat had, has or is likely to have official dealings. Acceptance of gifts by an Employee of the Secretariat from any other firm shall be subject to the provisions of sub-rule (3) 




Q1. What is its full form? -- Directive Principles of State Policy. Q2. From which country is it borrowed? -- Ireland (Which had c...




Q1. What is its full form?-- Directive Principles of State Policy.

Q2. From which country is it borrowed?-- Ireland (Which had copied it from Spanish Constitution)

Q3. How many articles are under DPSP?-- Article 36-51 belong to DPSP

Q4. Which part in Indian Constitution deals with DPSP?-- Part-IV belongs to DPSP

Q5. How many types of DPSP are there?--
There are three types:
1. Socialist
2. Gandhian
3. Liberal-Intellectual

Q6. Have Directive Principles ever amended?-- Yes, 42nd Amendment Act, 44th Amendment Act, and 86th Amendment Act have added/deleted a few DPSPs.

Q7. Are DPSP justiciable? -- No, DPSPs are non-justiciable in nature.

Q8. Are DPSP sub-ordinate to Fundamental Rights?-- There is a balance between both. Fundamental Rights can be amended to implement Directive Principles until it does not harm basic structure of the Constitution.

Q9. Who described DPSP as ‘novel feature’ of Constitution?-- Dr. B.R. Ambedkar

Q10. From where does Indian DPSPs find its motivation? -- Irish Home Rule Movement

Q11. What are the recent developments in favor of DPSPs?--
There are various such acts enacted to enforce DPSP. They are:
· Prevention of Atrocities Act (In favor of Article 46)
· Minimum Wages Act (In favor of Article 43)
· Consumer Protection Act
· Equal Remuneration Act (In favor of Article 39)

The aim of the paper is to test the candidates’ ability to read and understand serious discursive prose, and to express his ideas clearl...


The aim of the paper is to test the candidates’ ability to read and understand serious discursive prose, and to express his ideas clearly and correctly, in English and Indian language concerned. 

The pattern of questions would be broadly as follows: 
  • Comprehension of given passages 
  • Precis Writing 
  • Usage and Vocabulary 
  • Short Essays 

Indian Languages 
  • Comprehension of given passages 
  • Precis Writing 
  • Usage and Vocabulary 
  • Short Essays 
  • Translation from English to the Indian Language and vice-versa. 



Note: The syllabus for Indian Language and English will be of matriculation or equivalent standard. These papers are of qualifying nature and marks obtained will not be counted for final merit. Aspirants should answer the English and Indian Languages papers in English and the respective Indian language (except where translation is involved).


Candidates will be required to write an essay on a specific topic. There will be choice given from a variety of subjects. The candidate i...



Candidates will be required to write an essay on a specific topic. There will be choice given from a variety of subjects. The candidate is expected to stick to the subject of the essay and arrange their ideas in an orderly way. The writing has to be in concise way with numerous points in support of your essay topic. Those who has presented the essay in an articulate way with effective expression is likely to score high marks.

This paper plays a crucial role in determining the rank of the student. Most of the top rankers have scored above 55% in this paper. Some candidates have also scored around 60%. Such score can help the students to secure a position in the top ten ranks of the merit list.

Correct choice of topic and the appropriate method of writing are important. It is advised to choose factual topics where you can pack in lot of information. Try to avoid topics that are controversial in nature.


Method of Writing:
After deciding the topic
1. Start brain stroming
2. Write down all the ideas that you about the topic.
3. Do not classify or systematise your points at this stage.
4. Put them on paper randomly as they flow in.
5. Later, arrange the ideas in a logical and sequential manner.
6. Having arrived at the sequence, start writing, giving due care to the introduction, the body and finally the conclusion.
7. Ensure that you have enough time for revision.
8. Remember it is a General Essay Paper and you should not be highly technical.


(Technology, Economic Development, Bio-diversity, Environment, Security and Disaster Management) Indian Economy and issues rel...




(Technology, Economic Development, Bio-diversity, Environment, Security and Disaster Management)


  • Indian Economy and issues relating to Planning, Mobilization of Resources, Growth, Development and Employment.
  • Inclusive Growth and issues arising from it.
  • Government Budgeting.
  • Major Crops - Cropping Patterns in various parts of the country, - Different Types of Irrigation and Irrigation Systems; Storage, Transport and Marketing of Agricultural Produce and Issues and Related Constraints; E-technology in the aid of farmers.
  • Issues related to Direct and Indirect Farm Subsidies and Minimum Support Prices; Public Distribution System - Objectives, Functioning, Limitations, Revamping; Issues of Buffer Stocks and Food Security; Technology Missions; Economics of Animal-Rearing.
  • Food Processing and Related Industries in India- Scope’ and Significance, Location, Upstream and Downstream Requirements, Supply Chain Management.
  • Land Reforms in India.
  • Effects of Liberalization on the Economy, Changes in Industrial Policy and their Effects on Industrial Growth.
  • Infrastructure: Energy, Ports, Roads, Airports, Railways etc.
  • Investment Models.
  • Science and Technology- Developments and their Applications and Effects in Everyday Life.
  • Achievements of Indians in Science & Technology; Indigenization of Technology and Developing New Technology.
  • Awareness in the fields of IT, Space, Computers, Robotics, Nano-technology, Bio-technology and issues relating to Intellectual Property Rights.
  • Conservation, Environmental Pollution and Degradation, Environmental Impact Assessment.
  • Role of External State and Non-state Actors in creating challenges to Internal Security.
  • Challenges to Internal Security through Communication Networks, Role of Media and Social Networking Sites in Internal Security Challenges, Basics of Cyber Security; Money-Laundering and its prevention.
  • Security Challenges and their Management in Border Areas - Linkages of Organized Crime with Terrorism.
  • Various Security Forces and Agencies and their Mandate.


Indian Culture - Salient aspects of Art Forms, Literature, and Architecture from ancient to modern times. Modern Indian History fro...


  • Indian Culture - Salient aspects of Art Forms, Literature, and Architecture from ancient to modern times.
  • Modern Indian History from about the middle of the eighteenth century until the present- significant events, personalities, issues.
  • The Freedom Struggle — its various stages and important contributors/contributions from different parts of the country.
  • Post-independence Consolidation and Reorganization within the country.
  • History of the World will include events from 18th century such as Industrial Revolution, world wars, Redrawal of National Boundaries, Colonization, Decolonization, political philosophies like Communism, Capitalism, Socialism etc.— their forms and effect on the society.
  • Salient features of Indian Society, Diversity of India.
  • Role of Women and Women’s Organization, Population and Associated Issues, Poverty and Developmental issues, Urbanization, their problems and their remedies.
  • Effects of Globalization on Indian society.
  • Social Empowerment, Communalism, Regionalism & Secularism.
  • Salient features of World’s Physical Geography.
  • Distribution of Key Natural Resources across the world (including South Asia and the Indian sub-continent); factors responsible for the location of primary, secondary, and tertiary sector industries in various parts of the world (including India).
  • Important Geophysical Phenomena such as earthquakes, Tsunami, Volcanic activity, cyclone etc., geographical features and their location-changes in critical geographical features (including water-bodies and ice-caps) and in flora and fauna and the effects of such changes.



This paper will include questions to test the candidates’ attitude and approach to issues relating to integrity, probity in public life, an...






This paper will include questions to test the candidates’ attitude and approach to issues relating to integrity, probity in public life, and his problem-solving approach to various issues and conflicts faced by him in dealing with society. Questions may utilize the case study approach to determine these aspects. The following broad areas will be covered.



Ethics and Human Interface: Essence, determinants and consequences of Ethics in human actions; dimensions of ethics; ethics in private and public relationships.

Human Values – lessons from the lives and teachings of great leaders, reformers and administrators; the role of family, society and educational institutions in inculcating values.

Attitude: content, structure, function; its influence and relation with thought and behaviour; moral and political attitudes; social influence and persuasion.

Aptitude and foundational values for Civil Service, integrity, impartiality and non-partisanship, objectivity, dedication to public service, empathy, tolerance and compassion towards the weaker sections.

Emotional intelligence-concepts, and their utilities and application in administration and governance.

Contributions of moral thinkers and philosophers from India and the world.

Public/Civil service values and Ethics in Public administration: Status and problems; ethical concerns and dilemmas in government and private institutions; laws, rules, regulations and conscience as sources of ethical guidance; accountability and ethical governance; strengthening of ethical and moral values in governance;

Ethical issues in international relations and funding; corporate governance.

Probity in Governance: Concept of public service; Philosophical basis of governance and probity; Information

sharing and transparency in government, Right to Information, Codes of Ethics, Codes of Conduct, Citizen’s

Charters, Work culture, Quality of service delivery, Utilization of public funds, challenges of corruption.

Case Studies on the above issues.